October 2021

Post n°234
Published on 10/21/2021

By Chloé Zapha and David Fouet

Using out-of-court proceedings to resolve companies’ financial difficulties can help them to recover by preserving their reputation. However, directors seldom use them, partly because of a lack of information available about these facilities. It would be beneficial for small companies to make use of these "crisis exit" restructuring mechanisms, which are designed for them.

Chart 1: Out-of-court proceedings, which are more effective in helping businesses to recover, account for only 5% of proceedings initiated in 2019
Chart 1: Out-of-court proceedings, which are more effective in helping businesses to recover, account for only 5% of proceedings initiated in 2019 Note: judicial liquidation is “direct” when the company has not made use of other proceedings beforehand. Source: Ministry of Justice - Statistical analysis of the general civil register, 2019
Post n°233
Published on 10/14/2021

By Erwan Gautier, Magali Marx and Paul Vertier

A 1% increase in the price of imported refined diesel ultimately translates into a 0.75% increase in the pre-tax price and a 0.3% increase in the pump price of diesel including taxes in France. The adjustment does not occur immediately but is rapid: after one week, the increase in the pre-tax price is 0.45%, i.e. more than 50% of the final pass-through. Prices respond in the same way to an upward or downward shock.

Chart 1: Response of diesel prices to a 1% shock in the commodity cost
Chart 1: Response of diesel prices to a 1% shock in the commodity cost Sources: Ministry for the Ecological and Solidarity Transition, Reuters. Authors' calculations.
Post n°228
Published on 10/14/2021

Does requiring financial institutions to be more transparent about the climate impact of their portfolios encourage them to reduce their investments in the most polluting industries? We study the effect of a French law passed in 2015, the first to impose such an obligation. We show that investors subject to mandatory reporting have significantly reduced their holdings of securities issued by fossil fuel companies, compared to investors not targeted by the law.

Chart 1: Cumulated outstanding amount of securities issued by fossil fuel companies, held by treated financial institutions vs control group financial institutions
Chart 1: Cumulated outstanding amount of securities issued by fossil fuel companies, held by treated financial institutions vs control group financial institutions Source: Mésonnier and Nguyen (2021)
Post n°232
Published on 10/13/2021

By Yannick Kalantzis and Youssef Ulgazi

The recent rise in French inflation is temporary in nature but could last for a few more quarters. It is linked to a normalisation of prices after the lows seen in 2020, and to the increase in industrial goods and energy prices. After reaching a peak on the back of these temporary effects, inflation should come back to below the 2% mark over the course of 2022.

Chart 1: Banque de France projection for French inflation (Harmonised Index of Consumer Prices, %)
Chart 1: Banque de France projection for French inflation (Harmonised Index of Consumer Prices, %) Source: INSEE data up to the second quarter of 2021 and for the data point in the third quarter of 2021. Shaded area shows Banque de France projections. For the third quarter, only the inflation figure for July was available at the time of the projections
Post n°231
Published on 10/07/2021

By Florian Le Gallo and Kevin Schmitt

After a sluggish first half of the year, international travel picked up in the summer of 2021. In France, travel receipts amounted to EUR10.6 billion, down 29% compared to the summer of 2019 but up 25% compared to 2020. This rebound can be attributed to travellers from nearby countries. However, French travel spending abroad is also more dynamic, so that the surplus is still slightly lower than in the summer of 2020.

Chart 1: France’s monthly travel receipts (EUR billions, non-seasonally-adjusted data)
Chart 1: France’s monthly travel receipts (EUR billions, non-seasonally-adjusted data) Source: Banque de France
Post n°230
Published on 10/01/2021

By Daniele Siena and Riccardo Zago 

The occupational composition of the labour market is important for the relationship between prices and unemployment, i.e. the Phillips Curve (PC). The decline of the share of routine jobs can explain 1/4 of the recent flattening of the PC in the European Monetary Union (EMU).

Chart 1: The Slope of the Phillips Curve and Job Polarisation
Chart 1: The Slope of the Phillips Curve and Job Polarisation Note: This chart plots the slope of the price PC (1.a) and the routine employment share (1.b) across the EMU. Grey areas represent recessions, blue areas are the 95% confidence interval.